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 Scorpion Caresheet

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PostSubject: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 1:18 pm

Post Care sheets only. Comments will be automatically deleted. Thanks.


PAGE I


Hadrurus arizonensis
Hadogenes sp.
Centruroides vittatus
Centruroides margaritatus
Pandinus cavimanus
Mesobuthus martensii
Vaejovis spinigerus
Opistophthalmus sp.
Liocheles australasiae
Isometrus maculatus
Chaerilus celebensis
Rhopalurus junceus
Lychas Mucronatus
Liocheles waigiensis


PAGE II


Heterometrus swammerdami
Hottentotta hottentotta
Centruroides vittatus
Centruroides gracilis
Babycurus jacksoni
Pandinus imperator
Heterometrus sp.
Androctonus amoreuxi
Androctonus bicolor
Androctonus australis
Leiurus quinquestriatus
Smeringurus mesaensis
Parabuthus liosoma
Parabuthus transvaalicus
Parabuthus mossambicensis
Mesobuthus gibbosus
Scorpio maurus palmatus
Tityus stigmurus confluenciata
Opistacanthus apser
Ophistothalmus walberghi


PAGE III


Centruroides hentzi
Hadogenes troglodytes
Hottentotta judaicus
Tityus magnimanus
Tityus serrulatus
Uroctonus mordax
Vaejovis carolinianus
Babycurus gigas


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 1:59 pm

Hadrurus arizonensis, Desert Hairy Scorpion, Giant Desert Hairy
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Substrate: a few inches sand that has been dampened and left to dry under a heat lamp for a few days.

Humidity: low to moderate - around 50 - 55%. No water dish needed, as this is a desert species, and it has adapted in a way that allows it to receive all of its water needs from its prey.

Temperature: 80º to 90º Fahrenheit

Decor: whatever is aesthetically pleasing to the keeper (see below)

Preferred hiding spot: burrows, not much of a pet hole in my experience, they come out around 65% of the time (yes I did the math)

Communal: not sure, I've only ever kept one.(*added by abyss* Not communal however some have kept them in large enclosure with little to no problems. Best success is if they are all adults)

Temperment: mildly agro, they won't try to snuff you out, but they'll give a nasty nip or sting.

Venom: mild. non lethal, but you don't want it to ever happen again. Like a very, very angry hornet sting.

They aren't as docile as an emperor but not as agro as a heterometrus, somewhere in the middle (leaning more towards heterometrus). They're actually a little easier to keep than the golden standard P. imperator. In fact, I'm getting one for my Girlfriend to get her into the hobby!

-- Don't worry if it stops eating. Scorps have slow metabolisms and sometimes go months without eating for no real reason.

-- A new scorp likes to explore its habitat. My emperors wandered around lots at night when I first got them (they also took about a week to start a burrow). So, attempts to climb the glass are nothing to worry about.

-- "A scorp that stays in its burrow is a happy scorp." 'Nuff said. If you like seeing your scorpions, make a "starter burrow" against the side of the tank. They will most likely hang out there and you can see them while they feel secure and at home.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:03 pm

Hadogenes spp. (Flat-Rock Scorpions)
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Substrate: dry coco fiber / sand mix

Humidity: low; no water dish is necessary and occasional misting will suffice for moisture

Temperature: Hot (80s-90s Fahrenheit)

Decor: crevice-like hiding spots (stacked slate pieces are ideal)

Preferred hiding spot: in small crevices, sometimes digging out a shallow scrape underneath a rock (does not burrow)

Communal: generally not, though some people have reported success if plenty of hides and prey are available

Temperament: in my experience, Hadogenes are shy, but defensive when disturbed

Venom: incredibly weak (LD50 reported at 1800 mg venom / kg body mass)

This genus is native to southern Africa, and as such like it dry and toasty. They are among the slowest-growing scorpions, and as such can easily go for long periods without food. Small crevices are ideal hiding places considering their flattened body shape.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:12 pm

Centruroides vittatus (Striped Bark Scorpion)
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Centruroides Vittatus is also called the striped bark scorpion, or Texas bark scorpion, Vittatus means striped or banded in latin. It is the most common scorpion in the United States found in the inner southwest states, north up to souther Illinois and Missouri and East to the state of Florida and south into Northern Mexico. There are two morphs, Mesic and Xeric(Xeric -dryer , Mesic- humid). This specie is highly adaptable which is why it is very common. It has been known to withstand sub-zero temperatures.

Enclosure:
These guys can be densely packed. I had 13 in a 10 gallon and still had enough space to fit more.
A 2.5 gallon critter tank is plenty for one as long as they have vertical shards of bark to stay on since they are considered semi-aeroboral.

Hide:
One of the reasons these scorpions(or any bark scorpion) is neat, is the fact that they rest on bark which can make them visible all the time. They are not burrowers. They usually stay on the dark side of the bark. The most cormftable place for them is cracks in between the wood, they squeeze in and are almost impossible to get out. So in conclusion, use a piece of wood with crevices in it so they can hang on to, or crawl into.

Humidity:
Humidity isn't much of a concern for these guys. 60-75% would be their preference, but these guys are very resistant and can tolerate humidity much drier, or much wetter. Always have a bottlecap of water though, or mist once to twice a week.

Temperature:
Their preference is 75-85F. But as stated before, they do live in colder climates and can survive sub-zero temperatures when needed(This is something best left to those in the wild.) I keep mine at room temperature, no special heat needed. My room got to the high 50's a few times at night in winter and to the high 90's in summer to give you an idea.

Substrate:
I use a mixture of sand and peat moss, or just peat moss. I used only sand only for a few months, but I was recommended peat moss. These guys only use the substrate at night when they walk around, so it really isn't as important as it is to other scorpions.

Communal:
These are number one when it comes to communal scorpions. Like all scorpions though, there is always a risk of cannablism after a recent molt, so it's always best to keep only adults together. Also, they can be kept together with Centruroides Sculpturus. it is said that any centruroides can be kept together and that only their temperature/humidity needs are what keeps it from happening. So my guess is that they can be kept with the centruroides from Mexico since they live in similar condtitions.

Venom Potency:
Never heard of recorded deaths from this scorpion. Sting is probably a tad more painful then a bee sting. Ratng is given is usually 2/5.

Sexing:
Like all centruroides, the female has a fatter shorter metasoma(tail)
The male has a longer, skinnier, metasoma.

Other information:
-All instar scorpions will need a piece of bark so they can properly molt. Make sure it is not perfectly vertical(90 degrees) for they need to hang upside down. 45 degree angle and up is best.
-Second instars are very small and will need fruit flys.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:33 pm

Centruroides margaritatus (Central American Bark Scorpion)
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Bark Scorpions are usually small, agile, and very fast scorpions. There are many species in the genus Centruroides. These scorpions can hide in and escape from very small spaces. They climb well and some species can be found in buildings. Centruroides margaritatus is not deadly but has a painful sting that causes swelling and tingling (LD50 59.9 mg/kg). This species is about 5 to 8 cm long including the tail, and is native to Central and South America (the northern part of South America from what I know).

Range: Central America (also introduced to Florida)
Type: Arborial
Communal: In small numbers
Full Grown Size: 3-4"/8-11cm
Growth Rate: Medium
Temperature: 80-85F (23-26C)
Humidity: 70-80%
Temperment: Semi Aggressive
Speed: Medium
Venom: 2
Diet: Young can eat Pinhead crickets, small roaches, meal worms. Adults can eat large crickets, roaches, super worms.

Housing: Adults large critter keeper, 5 gallon tank, or rubbermaid type container. Young can live in small critter keepers or large deli cups

Substrate Depth/Type: 6-8" of sand with rocks or hides. Sand should be wet down, packed and allowed to dry to provide a stable burrowing substrait

More info: This species loves to climb and will often capture pray and live upside down in branches. Its natural habitates include under barks, crooks of limbs, and stones in tropical forests. In places where this species is introduced, it can be found inside houses, under stones and in piles of wood, debris and sacs, in both indoors & outdoors.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:36 pm

Pandinus cavimanus (Tanzanian Redclawed Scorpion)
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Pandinus cavimanus also called a Tanzanian Redclaw scorpion (along with a variety of other names) is a tropical scorpion with care similar to P imperator. The only cases of mistaken identity with this scorpion is with the P imperator but the differences are noticeable to the naked eye. Do not be fooled by their coloration. Some P imperators may have a reddish hue in the same way some P cavimanus have a blackish hue. The quickest way I've determined to tell the difference is the coloration of the telson. My P cavimanus's telson is uniform with the rest of it's body. Also the shape of the chela seems to be bulkier and more indented.

Enclosure: 5+ Gallons for a single individual with at least 10 for two or more.

Hide: Something they can bury beneath. I use a piece of wood from the pet store shaped like a cave with no bottom. I've found this species prefers to burrow down compared to my emperors which bury across. This could be a desire for more humidity which I have not tested.

Humidity: High ~75-80%. Keep the substrate moist but not sopping wet. The rule applies that if you wring the substrate it should not drip water. Keep a large water bowl for drinking and bathing purposes.

Temperature: Slightly lower than P imperator. Mine does fine at room temperature (A little over 72F).

Substrate: Some form of water retentive "dirt". I only have experience with cocofiber so I cannot say any alternatives. This must be at least 6 inches for an adult scorpion as they will very quickly become "pet holes".

Communal: Yes. I have heard sources claim they are extremely cannibalistic however I have never seen a problem in a well kept enclosure. I cannot say from personal experience as I only keep one but they appear to be as communal as P imperator. I will not recommend a cross-species enclosure with this species simply because their main defensive weapons (their claws) are far bulkier and further developed when compared to my P imperators.

Venom Potency: Very low. Not only is the venom of this species considered less potent than the P imperator, it is far less likely to strike. Only once have I seen a strike from mine and that was after a good 20 seconds of prodding (Uncooperative for a move). For the most part they lunge with their claws out-stretched at an disturbance. I receive a threat display any time I look into the enclosure. This is a more aggressive species.

Sexing: Sexing is similar to P imperator and Heterometrus sp. A quick glance at the pectines and genital opercula reveal the sex. Also from information received from another on the boards, the male has a tiny "tooth" on the movable finger.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 3:03 pm

Mesobuthus martensii (Chinese Armortailed Scorpion, Manchurian Scorpion, Chinese Golden Scorpion)
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Range: China
Type: Opportunistic Burrower
Communal: Yes
Full Grown Size: 3"
Growth Rate: Medium
Temperature: 80-85F (26-29C)
Humidity: 50-60%
Temperment: Semi Aggressive
Speed: Medium
Venom: 3
Diet: Young can eat Pinhead crickets, small roaches, meal worms. Adults can eat large crickets, roaches, super worms.

Housing: Adults medium critter keeper, 2 gallon tank, or rubbermaid type container. Young can live in small critter keepers or large deli cups

Substrate Depth/Type: 2-3" of peat/sand mix with rocks or hides. Pack down substrate and use flat rocks for them to create hides under

More info: This species is fairly communal, if provided with enough hiding spaces. A good rule of 1 scorpion per gallon of tank space is ideal. They also breed quite readily and begining to be a very common scorpion in the trade.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 3:06 pm

Vaejovis spinigerus (Stripe Tailed Scorpion)
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Range: Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico
Type: Opportunistic Burrower
Communal: In small numbers
Full Grown Size: 2"
Growth Rate: Medium
Temperature: 85-90F (29-32C)
Humidity: 50%
Temperment: Nervous/Aggressive
Speed: Medium
Venom: 2
Diet: Young can eat Pinhead crickets, small roaches, meal worms. Adults can eat large crickets, roaches, super worms.

Housing: Adults large critter keeper, 5 gallon tank, or rubbermaid type container. Young can live in small critter keepers or large deli cups

Substrate Depth/Type: 3-4" of sand with rocks or hides.
More info: This, unfortunately, isn't very popular in the hobby. It is a very fun scorpion, always active.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Jan 31, 2010 3:15 pm

Opistophthalmus sp. (Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion)
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There are over 59 species of Opistophthalmus, which are native to southern Africa. Although not especially dangerous, they have an aggressive temperament and will sting at the slightest provocation. These scorpions range from 6 to 11 cm in length (Leeming 2006) and makes deep burrows, hence the common name. They belong to the same family as the popular emperor scorpion (Pandinus imperator).

Captive Requirements
Housing: 6 to 10 L cage for large adults
Communal: No
Diet: Crickets, cockroaches
Substrate: 10 cm of soil or sand mixture
Decor: Rocks, driftwood, bark, water dish
Temperature: 26.7° C (80° F)
Humidity: Low
Temperament: Defensive, will sting
Considerations: Look, don't touch!


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Fri Feb 26, 2010 11:34 pm

Liocheles australasiae
(Dwarf Wood Scorpion)

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Claws: Strong pedipalps
Housing: Minimum 3 gallon glass tank with 3 inches of substrate
Temperature: 24-28°C (75.2-82.4°F)
Humidity: 70-80%
Birth Size: 20-25

Liocheles australasiae can be found occupying spaces under rocks, logs, down in any cracks in the earth where the humidity is high and it can tolerate quite wet conditions. Being a scorpion that has evolved to occupy cracks in rocks and other tight places has resulted in the scorpion becoming quite dorso-ventrally flattened, which means they somewhat mimic a crab with similar rapid sideways movements. They have been found inside logs that are buried in mud; they love wet conditions and are therefore very tolerant to potential fungal problems in captivity. Habitat appears to be variable as long as typical rainfall is above 550mm and temperatures above 15°C. Some recent information seems to suggest that they are more prevalent in higher rainfall areas (1000mm). Most common habitats are rock crevices, between rocks and the soil in shallow scrapes or rock crevices covered in rotting leaf matter but they may also be found beneath bark on fallen rotting logs and under rotting, solidifying leaf matter - usually on rock surfaces. Their flattened body shape is ideal for these locations.

Venom
This species has mild venom according to people contacted. It will rarely sting, and usually defends itself by using their powerful claws.

Breeding
Expect a gestation period of 12-18 months, depending on ambient temperature during this period of time, higher temperatures will give rise to a quicker gestation. 18-26 live born young will emerge over a few hours and gradually clamber onto the mother's back. There is no embryonic sac with this species as they display the more recent evolutionary form of embryonic development known as kaitoikogenic (at home) development. As first instars they will remain on mothers back for a number of weeks before shedding the membranous exoskeleton and become second instars after which they will gradually leave the mother to disperse.

When scorpions first shed their skins they are vulnerable to predators and physical damage until the new skin hardens and turns brown/black. Captive birth is quite common but it would appear that in these cases, most females are gravid when caught. Males are rarer than females so most of those kept in captivity are females. Survival rate appears to be highly variable. Most people report minimal if any cannibalism. A number of people have reported young staying close to, and inter-reacting with the mother for up to two months. However correct humidity (high) and temperatures of 20-30°C (68-86°F) are also of upmost importance. Failure to keep the humidity high and temperatures correct will result in incomplete molting to 2nd instar. Moult to 2nd Instar is approx 28 days. It will be your choice to remove any young scorpions or leave them in the big tank. If you wish to move them to a similar system away from the adults, then you will need to remove the gravid female before she gives birth or while the young are still on her back as once they disperse you’ll never find them all without completely destroying the tanks habitat. You can either choose to keep each young scorpion in a separate small sealed container or set up another false bottom tank to keep some or all of them in.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Dec 26, 2010 8:12 pm

Isometrus maculatus
Lesser Brown Scorpion
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Distribution:
Philippines, Hawaii, Australia, and other areas with tropical climates Housing: Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc. The young are best housed individually in vials or deli
containers with a vertical piece of bark and several small holes for ventilation. The young will use this bark to aid with molting and also to get away from the substrate if it becomes too moist. A water dish does not need to be provided for the juveniles. If the juveniles are fed regularly, they will obtain
enough moisture from their prey and they may also obtain additional moisture when the substrate is moistened. The adults can be housed together, if fed regularly, in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in
aquariums. A water dish should be provided for the adults to drink from. Also, there should be an ample number of hides, including some vertical ones for them to climb on.

Substrate:
Peat moss or coco fiber Place 1-3 in. or 2.5-7.5 cm of peat moss or coco fiber on the bottom of the enclosure and keep one-half of the enclosures substrate moist. When the substrate begins to dry out remoisten it.

Temperature:
70-90°F or 21-32°C Maintain the temperature at
70-90°F or 21-32°C. The higher the temperature
(within this range) the faster the scorpions will grow, breed, and give birth.

Humidity:
60-75% Diet: Crickets or roaches Feed the scorpions crickets or roaches that are smaller than the scorpion itself. Feed the
adults once every week and the juveniles twice weekly. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc. If the remains are left for an extended period of time an infestation of mites may occur.

Reproduction:
Sexual Sexing: Males have longer, more slender metasomas and pedipalps than females.

Venom level:
2 of 5 The venom toxicity of this scorpion is mild to moderate. When placed on a scale from
1-5, where 1 is mildly toxic venom and 5 is extremely toxic venom, it is a 2.
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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Dec 26, 2010 8:20 pm

Chaerilus celebensis
Philippine Speckled Scorpion
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Family :
Chaerilidae

Genus:
Chaerilus

Range:
this species is found in South and Southeast Asia.

Venom level: 1
This species is not considered to be dangerous!

Captive Care:
day time 78-85 night time temps 72-75F are the temps i keep them at, this is a sub-tropical species that does best in a humid
environment, so the temps should be 65-85.F and humidity %60 -% 70. they are typically found in forests within or under
rotting logs, between loose tree roots and in damp leaf litter.

Housing:
For adults: I use sterlite boxes "5" W x "6" L x "5" H. i just like to give them a little
extra room, but enclosures this large are
not needed. I use 2 oz. plastic deli cups, with a shallow layer of moist coco bedding for substrate, as with the adults i add a few small clumps of sphagnum moss, for my specimens to hide in. Cannibalism has been
reported for this species as well as my own observation, once i put a male and female
together and she had killed and eaten the male, and i had tried to keep a couple juveniles together and they killed and ate each other as well, so its best not to house more than one single specimen in an enclosure.

Adult size:
this species rarely attains adult lengths greater than (1.5 inches), the 2nd instars are only about 3 - 4 mm. total lengths, a 3rd instars will be double that of the 2nd instars being about 6 - 7mm, this is a very small species

Substrate:
i use moist coco bedding for substrate,
with small clumps of sphagnum moss, which i place in 1 or 2 corners of the enclosures for hides, ( they like it ).

Food:
small crickets / termites / and other small insects

Misting:
i mist these 3 times a week to keep humidity levels up.

Gestation period:
3 1/2 - 4 1/2 months
i had one give birth and it took 115 days.

Sexing:
males will have slightly
different shaped chelae than
the females, males are smaller and thinner bodied than the females, females will have more of a round chelae, the males chelae will be more angular shaped. the first pectine teeth ( left & right ) on females will be enlarged, so it can be tricky to sex
Chaerilus celebensis since they are so small !

Pectine count:
the pectine count for this species is,
( 4 teeth for females & 5 teeth for males )
i think its quite unusual that hey have so few pectine teeth, but this is a tiny species!

Lifespan:
2 - 6 years

Brood sizes:
i believe there is a range from 18 to 40 with this species, but its a likely round about i have come up with.

Additional information:
i had one female give birth to a brood of 33 offspring, and it took 115 days ( 3 months 3 weeks & 4 days) between broods, they molt from 1st instar into 2nd instar between 4 & 6
days, i believe they reach adulthood between 5th instar & 6th instar, AGAIN THERE IS VERY LITTLE IS KNOWN REGARDING THIS SPECIES, and these are all my own observations of this species in captivity, my survival rate with the offspring has been 10 out of 10 to date. this species will also play dead when they feel a threat or touched by something, its quite odd but its another neat thing this species does playing dead.
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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Dec 26, 2010 8:41 pm

Rhopalurus junceus is a
medium sized scorpion that is
native to Cuba. These 3.5-4.5 inch Bark Scorpions are a
beautiful reddish/orange
color. It is safe to say these
are one of the most desired
specimens to add to any
collection. Unfortunately, they have been rare in collections
with the exception of a few
hobbyists in Europe. Late in
2005 and early 2006 I was
able to acquire 5 mid sized
juveniles thru 3 different transactions. I acquired these
specimens with the hopes of
breeding and getting a nice
captive population started
here in the USA. They seem
relatively easy to breed and the husbandry is near
identicle to other tropical
Bark Scorpion species such as
Centruroides spp and Tityus
spp.
Housing adults should be done the very same as with
Centruroides gracilis. For this
I use plastic Sterlite or
Rubbermade shoe boxes that
can be purchased at
practically any Dollar Store. It is important to drill several
small holes around the sides
of the box to provide some
ventilation. For substrate,
about 3 inches of slightly
moist peat moss can be used. When the peat moss starts to
get a little dry, I pour water
directly on the substrate until
about half of it is moist again.
It is important not to get the
substrate too moist. Also important is to add several
pieces of wood, cork bark etc
for hides and for them to be
able to get off the moist
substrate. Unlike several
Tityus spp which seem to prefer to rest directly on
moist substrate, R junceus
seems to prefer resting
between the stacks of wood.
One of the more common
mistakes a novice keeper will make is trying to house
scorpions such as this in
Kritter Keepers. The "open
screen top" on a Kritter
Keeper will allow the
substrate to dry out very fast and not keep the humidity
high enough. They seem to do
well with temperatures at
around 80F. While they may
live at temps in the lower
70sF, they will grow and be much healthier when kept in
the low 80sF. Only adults
should be kept in groups as
juveniles will often
cannibalize a cage mate
during molting. Adults will eat 1-3 medium crickets a week.
Like males of many species,
Rhopalurus junceus males
seldom feed.
Breeding is typical and rather
straight forward. After I had my first pair to mature in
August of 2006, I put them
together in their own plastic
shoe box. After about 30
minutes the male and female
were courting. Oddly enough, I did not find a
spermataphore until the next
morning. It was obvious that
they did not finish mating
until I turned out the lights for
the night. Determining the sex of the adults is easy to do.
Like most scorpions, the
males are much thinner and
delicate looking than the
more robust females. The
chela (claws) of the males is more bulbous with the
fingers being slightly curved.
The male cannot close the
fingers completely due to the
curve. The females however
have much thinner and straighter chela that can
completely close their fingers
together. I have also noted
that the males are a lighter
more orangeish color when
compared to the darker red females. I know of no other
way to determine the sex of
this species and
unfortunately the hobbyist
will have to wait until
adulthood in order to accurately sex them.
In January of 2007 my wait
was over. My female gave
birth to 21 babies.
Interestingly, it took two days
for all the babies to be born. The only other time I have
seen this happen was with a
Heterometrus laoticus in
2005. While this number is
low when compared to the
reports of some European breeder's reports this is a
start. About a week after
giving birth I gently coaxed
the female into a deli cup
with moist peat. I do this with
all my Bark Scorpion species as this makes capturing the
babies much easier than if
they were in the adult
enclosure. After about 10
days the young molted into
2nd instars. Less than a week later the young started to
disperse from the Mother's
back. I then returned the
female back to the adult
enclosure. To house the
young, I set up 50 Dram vials that can be purchased from
Thornton Plastics. I filled
roughly 1/3 with moist peat
moss. In order for the young
to molt properly it is
important to provide a climb. In this case I leaned peaces
of tree bark inside each vial.
The young need to be kept
separately until adult. This
insures there will be no
cannibalism and with the low numbers in the hobby each
individual counts. The 2nd
instar young are a decent
size and feed voraciously on
small crickets and small
lobster roach nymphs. I feed them 2-3 times a week until
they "plump up". The
specimens I recieved were
mid sized juveniles so I am
not sure how many molts it
takes for one to mature. Judging by the time it took for
mine to mature I can safely
assume that it takes over a
year and probably closer to a
year and a half.
Although Rhopalurus junceus is a very rare scorpion in the
hobby now, with this birth
gives much hope that more
and more hobbyists will be
able to acquire this beautiful
species in the not so distant future. At the time of this
writing I have a different
mated female that should be
giving birth anytime and a
fellow scorpion enthusiast
has a mated pair as well. It should be noted that anyone
getting this species in the
future should try to breed
them in order to keep a good
number in the hobby as it is
pretty safe to say that there will be no imports of this
species anytime soon from
Cuba. This is a really nice
species worthy of any
collection as they are
impressive and beautiful to look at.
I would like to give a warm
thanks to my friends Alex
Tietz, Tom van der Ende and
Vincent Wisse. Their advice
has been helpful over the past few years and I have
benefited greatly.
Rhopalurus junceus males
are thinner than females with
more bulbous chela. When
adult the males chela looks like this. It will not close all
the way since it is slightly
curved. It is most likely built
this way in order to court the
females
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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Tue Dec 28, 2010 7:52 pm

Common Name: Chinese Swimming Scorpion Scientific Name: Lychas Mucronatus Type: Arboreal, but I have found them to be light
burrowers - one of mine is
digging under the log I have
sticking out of the substrate
and comes out when there is
commotion. Growth Rate: Fast Size: 2" - 2.5" Venom: 3 Temperament: Medium Temp: 75-85 F Humidity: 75-80% Substrate: I use a mix of coco fiber and sand, it
maintains humidity well.
about 3" deep. give them
some bark to climb on, cork
bark works best as with any
arboreal sp. I also have lava rocks and a small rock water
dishes with about an inch of
water in it. Housing: A 5gal tank is fine. I'm using Rubbermaid
containers as temporary
housing until I get off my bum
and cut the Acrylite and
make a shelf. Communal: Yes, for the most part - cannibalism can
happen as juvies. they can
co-habitate with mesobuthus
martensii Notes: Gorgeous species. known to breed like rabbits
even with scorplings still
riding piggyback. they like to
hide and allegedly like to
soak in water (I have not
witnessed them taking interest in soaking or
swimming so I cannot attest
to this) *I have been watching mine during feeding and it's a very
interesting hunter. instead of
looking for food or stalking
it's food it hangs in wait and
when the prey passes below
it snags it up in it's pedipalps and in some cases I've
witnessed it holding the prey
alive until it's ready to eat it
and then it stings it. I would
say that these guys are fast
as lightening.
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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:32 pm

liocheles waigiensis
Regions Found: Papua New Guinea,
Philippines, Indonesia and
Australia Class: Rainforest burrower Longevity: unknown Adult Scorpion Size: Temperament: Claws: Strong pedipalps Sting Potency: Liocheles waigiensis
Housing Requirements Scorpion Housing: Minimum 3 gallon glass tank with 3 inches of substrate Temperature range: 20-30°C (68-86°F) Humidity range: 80-90% Special Requirements: There are no special
requirements. Liocheles waigiensis
Breeding Breeding Difficulty: Easy Birth Size: 20-25 Danger to Male: Minimal Liocheles waigiensis Diet A scorpions diet should
consist mainly of livefood
insects such as crickets , locust, butter worms , meal worms , superworms , houseflies and cockroaches . Recommended Pet
Supplies for Liocheles
waigiensis An appropriately sized vivarium /aquarium Substrate Heating equipment ie heat lamps, heat mats and thermostats Large shallow water dish Decorations and hiding
places Livefood
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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:47 am

Indian Giant Forest Scorpion (Heterometrus swammerdami)

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Regions Found: Southern Asia and Malaysia
Class: Terrestrial species
Longevity: 5-8 years in captivity and 3-7 years in the wild.
Adult Scorpion Size: 20+ cm
Temperament: Aggressive
Claws: Strong pedipalps
Sting Potency: Not lethal to humans - comparitive to a bee sting
Heterometrus swammerdami Housing Requirements
Scorpion Housing: Minimum 6 gallon glass tank with 6-7cm (4 inches) of substrate such as peat-free compost covered with orchid bark chippings.
Temperature range: 24-28°C (75.2-82.4°F)
Humidity range: 60 - 80%
Special Requirements: Suitable for groups and can be housed communally
Heterometrus swammerdami Breeding
Breeding Difficulty: Average to difficult
Birth Size: Average of 12
Danger to Male: Low
Heterometrus swammerdami Diet
A scorpions diet should consist mainly of livefood insects such as crickets, locust, butter worms, meal worms, superworms, houseflies and cockroaches.
Recommended Pet Supplies for Heterometrus swammerdami
An appropriately sized vivarium/aquarium
Substrate
Heating equipment ie heat lamps, heat mats and thermostats
Large shallow water dish
Decorations and hiding places
Livefood



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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Mon Mar 07, 2011 10:25 pm

Hottentotta hottentotta

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Distribution: Africa

Housing: Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc.

The young are best housed individually in deli containers with several small holes in the top or sides of the container for ventilation.

The adults can be housed together, if fed regularly, in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in aquariums. They should be provided with a water dish about every three weeks. Also there should be an ample number of hides in the enclosure.

Substrate: Peat moss/ coco fiber and sand mixture

Place 1-2 in. or 2.5-5 cm of a dry 40% peat moss/ coco fiber and 60% sand mixture on the bottom of the enclosure. Lightly mist a portion of the substrate every two weeks.

Temperature: 70-90°F or 21-32°C

Maintain the temperature at 70-90°F or 21-32°C. The higher the temperature (within this range) the faster the scorpions will grow, breed, and give birth.

Humidity: 50-60%

Diet: Crickets or roaches

Feed the scorpions crickets or roaches that are smaller than the scorpion itself. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc.

Reproduction: Parthenogenetic

Venom level: 3 of 5

The venom toxicity of this scorpion is moderate. When placed on a scale from 1-5, where 1 is mildly toxic venom and 5 is extremely toxic venom, it is a 3.

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PostSubject: Striped Scorpion   Sun May 22, 2011 7:14 pm

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Striped Scorpion
Striped Bark Scorpion
Family: Buthidae

Centruroides vittatus

An extremely small scorpion, an adult Striped Scorpion or Striped Bark Scorpion reaches only about an inch in total length!This small scorpion, the Striped Scorpion or Striped Bark Scorpion, is the most widespread scorpion in the United States.

Though it won't take up much space and can be a great curiosity, the Striped Scorpion does not make a handleable pet. This small species has a powerful sting that often produces intense pain that lasts for several hours. Other than this pain, however, there are rarely any other medical complications.

An interesting feature related to the native habitat of the Striped Scorpion is its ability to remain alive during extended periods of below freezing weather. Recent studies show that species capable of living through these conditions have a protein-like substance that allows them to survive by "trapping" ice crystals in their gut.

Centruroides vittatus
Photo © Animal-World: Courtesy Russ Gurley
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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 2:54 pm

Centruroides gracilis
(Slenderbrown Bark Scorpion)
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This scorpion is found in Florida, Central America and several islands in the Caribean. These are good climbers and are often found in tree bark and hollow trees. This is a communal species so small groups can be kept together as long as they are well fed.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the usual kritter keepers, sterlite boxes etc. Many keepers use tall tanks and lean cork bark against the sides for climbing. Be sure to use a good fitting top on the enclosure for these.

SUBSTRATE
Peat moss and/or potting soil about an inch or 2 deep is all that is needed since this species doesn't burrow.

FEEDING
Crickets,roaches or other small insects

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
70-85F is fine. These scorps seem to do well in a slightly humid environment. Keep the subustrate slightly damp (not wet) and restrict the ventilation. I also let the water dish over flow some when I give mine water.

VENOM TOXICITY
The one found in Florida have mild venom (around 2) where as some from Cent America can be very toxic(around 4). Anytime you acquire one of these it is a good idea to ask where it came from. The ones from Florida are the best ones to get especially for a beginner.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 2:55 pm

Babycurus jacksoni
(Rusty Thick Tail)
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These neat little scorpions come from Tanzania and other parts of East Africa. They are a communal species so small groups can be kept together as long as they are well fed. They will attack large prey for their size which is 3-4 inches as adults. In the wild they can be found in tree bark and ground litter. They do not burrow but climb very well.They are very similar to the Centruroides spp of the New World.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the usual kritter keepers, aquariums etc. It is good to provide some verticle structure such as cork bark for them to climb.

SUBSTRATE
Peat moss and/or potting soil makes the best substrate. It is recommended that part of the substrate me moist and part be dry so they can choose the humidity they prefer. One can also let the water dish over flow some when watering.

FEEDING
The usual crickets, roaches etc. are fine for this scorpion. Don't let their size fool you. I have had them kill and eat crickets larger than they are.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
Temps from 75-85 F are fine. This species in the wild experiences a very dry season and a wet season. Therefore some keep these as humid as Emperors while some keep them rather dry. As mentioned above, I like to give them a variety with a dry and a moist side and they appear to be doing well. Remember that it is a good idea to slightly increase humidity for any scorp when they are preparing to molt.

VENOM TOXICITY
Some places list these as medically significant while others do not. I am guessing they would be around a 2 on the scale. They might pack a wallop so it would be wise to not get stung by them (or any scorp for that matter)


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 2:57 pm

Pandinus spp (Emperor Scorpion) and Heterometrus spp (Asian Forest Scorpion)

This will work for any of the Pandinus or Heterometrus species.
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Pandinus imperator

There are many ways to do this but this is my preferred way. First of all Emperors are a tropical scorp from West Africa therefore they prefer hot and humid conditions. I keep mine at around 80F but some keepers have theirs at 90F.
To start, pour 1-2 inches of gravel in the bottom of the tank. A large kritter keeper or 10 gal aquarium will house 1 scorpion. Pour 4-8 inches of peat, potting soil or mixture of both on the gravel. Then insert a 1/2-1 inch diameter pvc pipe in the corner of tank to the gravel layer.. This is for pouring water into the gravel layer which leeches up through the substrate giving the humidity the scorpion needs. Also provide a water dish and a hiding place. When the substrate dries pour some water down the tube again. This method works far better than misting all the time. If your room temp is cool you can stick a reptile heater on the SIDE of the tank which will usually warm tank about 5-7 more degrees. The one I use is a Zoo med.

FEEDING
Emperors will eat crickets,roaches and sometimes mealworms and superworms. They can and will go long periods of time without feeding so don't worry if the scorpion doesn't eat much at first. When they are plump they may go months without feeding. Mine will usually go from one extreme to the other. Gorging on everything they can get for awhile and then not feeding hardly at all for a month or two.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 2:58 pm

Androctonus spp (Fat Tail Scorpions)

This Genus has some of the most dangerous scorpions in the world.


Androctonus amoreuxi
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Androctonus bicolor
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Androctonus australis
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These scorpions are found from N Africa to the Middle East and into Pakistan and Western India. A australis is attributed to killing more people than any scorpion in the world. They are fast and will readily sting. These are for experienced hobbyists. In saying this, like all scorpions they can't climb glass or plastic so are easy to manage. If you decide to keep these exercise extreme caution. They are my personal favorites to keep but I try to always be cautious

HOUSING
They can be kept in the usual kritter keepers, plastic boxes, aquariums etc. Whatever you decide to use be sure it is secure. It wouldn't be good to have one running loose in the house. Check out the Scorpion Enclosures Thread for some pictures.

SUBSTRATE
These are all opportunistic burrowers from desert environments. From 1-3 inches of sand or dry peat with a hide and a small water dish will be fine.

FEEDING
Crickets and other insects will be readily taken by these. They always sting their prey so feeding time is always exciting to watch.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
They do well in a dry environment with 70-85F TEMPS. I water mine about once every 2 weeks and lightly mist the substrate about once a month.

VENOM TOXICITY
These are very dangerously venomous!!! Be very careful when working with these.
A australis is the hottest at (5). The others are at least a (4).


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 2:59 pm

Leiurus quinquestriatus (Deathstalker)
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This scorpion is said to have the most toxic venom of any known scorpion. They are native to the deserts of N Africa and the Middle East. This is another scorpion for the advanced keeper. Be very careful with these.

HOUSING
The usual kritter keepers, small aquariums or plastic boxes. Provide stacked rocks or half log for a hide.Make sure the enclosure is secure. Like all scorpions they can't climb glass or plastic.

SUBSTRATE
Dry peat moss or sand

FEEDING
Crickets and other small insects

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
This is a typical desert species that does well in a dry environment. Temps should be 70-85F. Provide a small water dish about every 2 weeks and mist the substrate about once a month. If the scorpion appears like a molt is approach, more frequent misting would be good.

VENOM TOXICITY
(5) Very dangerously venomous!!! Exercise caution when keeping these.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 3:00 pm

Smeringurus mesaensis (Dune Scorpion)
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This scorpion is found in sandy dune areas of Western Arizona and the Mohave Desert of California (not as common as one might think). They are commonly "harvested" and used as gifts such as belt buckles and paper weights. This species is next to impossible to breed in captivity (it has yet to be done) and is extremely fast. They seem to teleport from place to place. Despite its speed, it makes a good beginner scorpion as it tends to flee rather than attack

HOUSING
Adults should have a large critter keeper or small 5.5g fish tank. This species prefers and extremely dry environment with plenty of running room.

SUBSTRATE
Sand only

FEEDING
crickets (in wild, native areas 90% of an adult Smeringurus mesaensis' diet is younger S. mesaensis)

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
This species is found in some of the driest, hottest areas of the US. Daytime temperaturs should be at least 80+F. Because of their native environment, night time temps can greatly vary from daytime temps, but should keep them over 60F. Smeringurus mesaensis does not appreciate humidity and water. There is little need to keep a water dish, make sure you're crickets are well fed and hydrated and the S. mesaensis will be fine.

VENOM TOXICITY
Smeringurus mesaensis, while very fast, packs a fairly mild sting. On a scale from 1-5 they will rank in around 2.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 3:01 pm

Parabuthus spp (Thick Tail Scorpions)
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Parabuthus liosoma
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Parabuthus transvaalicus
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Parabuthus mossambicensis
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These are from Southern to Eastern Africa and parts of the Middle East. They closely resemble Androctonus. At least 2 species (P tranvaalicus & P mossambicensis) are capable of spraying venom.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the typical deli cups, kritter keepers, sterlite boxes etc.

SUBSTRATE
Dry peat, sand or a mixture of both makes fine substrate. It does not not have to be very deep as these typically only make scrapes under rocks, or other ground debris.

FEEDING
The usual crickets, roaches and other insects.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
These scorpions are from the deserts and savannahs of Africa so temps from 75F to 85F will work very well. Keep the humidity low but always provide a water dish especially for gravid females.

VENOM TOXICITY
These have potent venom of a (3). They are capable of producing large quantity of venom so therefore are considered a potentially dangerous species. Be careful if you decide to keep these.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   

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Scorpion Caresheet
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