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 Scorpion Caresheet

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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 3:03 pm

Mesobuthus gibbosus
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M. gibbosus anatolicus live on Cypres.
M. gibbosus gibbosus live Greece and Turkey but not in the North of Turkey.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the kritter keepers, sterlite boxes etc.
Semi-communal

SUBSTRATE
Arid/semi-arid habitats with little vegetation. Don't dig burrows, but use natural burrows under stones and other objects.

FEEDING
The usual crickets, roaches and other insects.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
Moderate to limited humidity (30-40%). In the summer 24 - 35 Celsius. Winter between 10 - 20 Celsius

VENOM TOXICITY
These have potent venom of a (2+). And are very fast when they sting.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 3:06 pm

Scorpio maurus palmatus
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General:
This species is 6-8 cm long, and the different subspecies are varying in colors. Most have a yellow to red brown color (the tip of the claws are usually dark red brown), but some subspecies (like S. maurus fuscus) are dark brown/blackish in color. The different subspecies can be separated by the color variations, but not always. It is possible that some of the subspecies represent true species, but a thorough revision of the genus is necessary before any conclusion can be drawn.

This species is often found in colonies, but each scorpion has it's own burrow..

This species is kept in captivity. Breeding seems difficult.

Common names:
This was the first scorpion species scientific described (by Linnaeus himself), and the name Scorpio means scorpion. The specific name, maurus means dark or obscure. The species is sometimes known a the Large clawed Scorpion or Israeli Gold Scorpion.

Distribution:
Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Senegal, Tunisia), Asia (Iraq, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, Yemen).

Habitat:
This species is often found in desert habitats, but can also be found in dry forests. It is a burrowing species, which inhabits different types of substrate (burrowing must be possible). The burrows are often 20 - 70 cm deep (the bottom of the borrow is usually enlarged). This species lives in very warm habitats, but will experience winter temperatures down to 10-15 C in some areas (the scorpion will "hibernate" in the burrow during winter).

Venom:
Mildly venomous, but a painful sting. Harmless for healthy humans. This aggressive species will often use claws for defense, and not use the stinger. LD50 values are reported to be 9.37 - inactive (mg/kg) and 141.6 - inactive (mg/kg).


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Wed Jan 04, 2012 3:06 pm

Tityus stigmurus confluenciata
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This scorpion 5 - 6,5 cm / 2 - 2,5 inch long are from Southern America "Brazil" Pectines : 18 - 25 teeth is Parthenogenesis and very communal.

Housing
When u used a box of 30L x 20W x 15 H cm / 12L x 8W x 6H inch is good for 3 scorps. The like a peace of bark as hiding place.

Substrate
Humus mixed with vermiculite

Feeding
Crickets, roaches and other insects.

Temperature and Humidity
Keep them between 25-32 C / 77-90 F and 70-80 %

Venom Toxicity
On a scale from 1-5 they would be 5 and higher. Be careful when these species sting, you have a high risk on anaphylactic shock and there is a special Antivenom from Instituto Butantan for this specie.


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PostSubject: Yellow Legged Creeping Scorpion   Sat Jan 07, 2012 1:13 pm

Yellow Legged Creeping Scorpion
(Opistacanthus apser)
by Jon Fouskaris


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The Yellow Legged Creeping Scorpion is a rare and unique scorpion species. In the wild, they are found in Acadia Trees because they are full of holes and other hiding spaces. They block themselves from predators by putting their pinchers together as a shield when they are hiding in their holes of tree bark, piles of wood, or whatever they can squeeze into. This is an attractive species of scorpion, that has weak venom and a good temperament. They will pinch you though, if they are given the opportunity, so watch out. The Yellow Legged Creeping Scorpion has a shiny black body with yellow legs, hence the name. There are not many specimens of this species in the United States. Few collectors have the true Yellow Legged Creeping Scorpion. It has potential to be an excellent beginners' scorpion, if it wasn't so hard to obtain. It it also good for most advanced keepers, because it is so hard to obtain. Overall, the Yellow Legged Creeping Scorpion is a great species of scorpion for any collector!

Range: Moist forests in parts of South Africa, Mozambique, Botswana, Swaziland and Zimbabwe.
Type: Terrestrial.
Diet: Babies eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, and other large insects.
Full Grown Size:2 to 3 inches.
Growth: Slow speed.
Temperature: 85 to 95° F.
Humidity: 78 to 82%. Adults may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.
Temperament: Semi-docile and calm.
Housing: Babies can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 2.5-gallon tank. Floor space is as important as height.
Substrate: 1 to 2 inches of peat moss, potting soil, vermiculite, or wood chips.
Decor: Logs, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good hiding places.
Other Names: N/A.

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PostSubject: Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion    Sat Jan 07, 2012 1:24 pm

Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion
(Ophistothalmus walberghi)
by Jon Fouskaris
*Information provided by Frank Somma


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ADULT FEMALE
Specimen provided by Frank Somma.
Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris.

The Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion is quite an impressive species! Between its' huge size, its' bulky appearance, and its' curious coloration, the Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion makes a great showcase scorpion. The common name, of course, derives from the three main colors that make up its' exoskeleton: mahogany, tan, and yellow. A Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion can be rather aggressive at times, therefore a first-time scorpion keeper may want to bypass this species, but if you can be a careful beginner, go for it. When keeping the Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion, remember it is for looking, not touching, even though these scorpions do not have extremely toxic venom like some of their northern cousins. There are about 35 species in the genus Ophistothalmus, and of these, 2 or 3 species appear in the pet trade. The Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion is one of them. Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpions are not rare, but they can be harder to obtain than other common species. Whether you have hundreds of scorpions or you don't even have one, the Tri-Color Burrowing Scorpion can turn out to be a good purchase, with a little bit of caution.

Range: Found throughout southern Africa.
Type: Burrowing.
Diet: Babies eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, and other large insects.
Full Grown Size: 4 to 5 inches.
Growth: Slow speed.
Temperature: Around 80° F.
Humidity: Around 70%. Adults may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.
Temperament: Semi-aggressive and nervous.
Housing: Babies can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 or 10-gallon tank. Floor space is as important as height.
Substrate: 3 to 4 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.
Decor: No decorations are really needed, but you can add rocks, or cork bark.
Other Names: Walberg's Tri-Color Scorpion.

*Please note that ALL scorpions have a certain amount of venom. Although most people are not affected by this species, some people may be allergic to the venom, or just more sensitive, making it a dangerous situation. This is one of the reasons that people should not handle this scorpion. Affects of this scorpions' natural defenses may vary between people. All scorpions should be considered dangerous, so be careful, because you don't want to find out if you are allergic or more sensitive the HARD WAY!

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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Fri Feb 24, 2012 12:53 pm

Centruroides hentzi

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Distribution:Florida, southern Georgia, and coastal Alabama; possibly introduced in North and South Carolina


Housing:Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc.
The young are best housed individually in deli containers with a small piece of vertical bark and several small holes for ventilation.
The adults can be housed together, if fed regularly, in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in aquariums. A water dish should be provided for the adults to drink from. Also there should be an ample number of hides, mostly vertical ones. This species is the smallest Centruroides native to the U.S. This means that they can escape from much smaller openings than many others.


Substrate:Peat moss or coco fiber or sand mixture
About 2 in. or 5 cm of substrate should suffice. Pure peat moss or coco fiber can make up the substrate or they can be mixed with a small amount of sand. The substrate should be kept moist.


Temperature: 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C
Maintain the temperature at 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C. The higher the temperature (within this range) the faster the scorpions will grow, breed, and give birth. No winter cooling is necessary for breeding.


Humidity:65-75%

Diet:Crickets or roaches
Feed the scorpions appropriately sized crickets or roaches. Feed the adults once every week and the juveniles twice weekly. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc. If the remains are left for an extended period of time an infestation of mites may occur.
C. hentzi are capable of taking down roaches and other prey that are the same size as their body length (excluding their tails). They will also readily accept crickets the same size as they are as long as the heads are crushed and the back legs removed. Despite their small size, they are quite aggressive towards prey items.


Venom level:2
The venom toxicity of this scorpion is mild to moderate. When placed on a scale from 1-5, where 1 is mildly toxic venom and 5 is extremely toxic venom, it is a 2. Their sting is painful but not known to be medically significant.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:03 pm

Hadogenes troglodytes

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Distribution:South Africa

Housing:Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc.
They can be housed in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in aquariums. A water dish is needed for this species. There should also be an ample number of hides, consisting of flat rocks (as there common name implies). They are not communal, so housing them together will most likely result in cannibalism.


Substrate:Dry peat moss/ coco fiber or sand
Place 2 in. or 5 cm of a 60% peat moss or coco fiber and 40% sand mixture on the bottom of the enclosure or use 100% pure peat moss/ coco fiber and mist the substrate, approximately every month as needed.


Temperature: 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C
Maintain the temperature at 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C. The higher the temperature (within this range) the faster the scorpions will grow, breed, and give birth.


Humidity:60-70%

Diet:Crickets or roaches
Feed the scorpions crickets or roaches that are smaller than the scorpion itself. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc. If the remains are left for an extended period of time an infestation of mites may occur.


Reproduction:Sexual

Sexing: Both males and females of this species have elongated, flattened bodies, but a male's metasoma is much longer.

Venom level:1
The venom of this scorpion is mildly toxic.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:17 pm

Hottentotta judaicus

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Distribution:Middle East

Housing: Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc.
The young are best housed individually in deli containers with a small piece bark and several small holes for ventilation.
The adults can be housed together, if fed regularly, in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in aquariums. They should also be provided with a water dish. Also there should be an ample number of hides in the enclosure.


Substrate: Peat moss/ coco fiber and sand mixture
Place 1-2 in. or 2.5-5 cm of a dry 40% peat moss/ coco fiber and 60% sand mixture on the bottom of the enclosure.


Temperature:70-90°F or 21-32°C
Maintain the temperature at 70-90°F or 21-32°C. The higher the temperature (within this range) the faster the scorpions will grow, breed, and give birth.


Humidity:50-60%

Diet:Crickets or roaches
Feed the scorpions crickets or roaches that are smaller than the scorpion itself. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc.


Reproduction:Sexual

Sexing:Females have 22-27 pectine teeth. Males have 27-32 pectine teeth.

Venom level: 3


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:28 pm

Tityus magnimanus

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Distribution:Venezuela

Housing: Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc.
The young are best housed individually in vials or deli containers with a vertical piece of bark and several small holes for ventilation. The young will use this bark to aid with molting and also to get away from the substrate if it becomes too moist. A water dish does not need to be provided. If the juveniles are fed regularly, they will obtain enough moisture from their prey and they may also obtain additional moisture when the substrate is moistened.
The adults can be housed together in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in aquariums. There should be an ample number of hides, depending on the number of adults.


Substrate:Peat moss or coco fiber
Place 1-3 in. or 2.5-7.5 cm of peat moss or coco fiber on the bottom of the enclosure and keep it moist. When the substrate begins to dry out remoisten it.


Temperature:70-85°F or 21-29.5°C
Maintain the temperature at 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C. The higher the temperature (within this range) the faster the scorpions will grow, breed, and give birth.


Humidity:70-85%

Diet:Crickets or roaches
Feed the scorpions crickets or roaches that are smaller than the scorpion itself. Feed the adults once every week and the juveniles twice weekly. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc. If the remains are left for an extended period of time an infestation of mites may occur.


Reproduction:Sexual

Venom level: 4
The venom toxicity of this scorpion is extremely toxic.



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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:37 pm

Tityus serrulatus

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Distribution:Brazil

Housing: Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc.
The young are best housed individually in vials or deli containers with a vertical piece of bark and several small holes for ventilation. The young will use this bark to aid with molting and also to get away from the substrate if it becomes too moist. A water dish does not need to be provided until around the 4th-5th instar. If the juveniles are fed regularly, they will obtain enough moisture from their prey and they may also obtain additional moisture when the substrate is moistened.
The adults can be housed together in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in aquariums. A water dish should be provided for the adults to drink from. Also there should be an ample number of hides, depending on the number of adults.


Substrate: Peat moss or coco fiber
Place 1-3 in. or 2.5-7.5 cm of peat moss or coco fiber on the bottom of the enclosure and keep it moist. When the substrate begins to dry out remoisten it


Temperature:70-85°F or 21-29.5°C
Maintain the temperature at 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C. The higher the temperature (within this range), the faster the scorpions will grow and reproduce.


Humidity: 70-80%

Diet:Crickets or roaches
Feed the scorpions crickets or roaches that are smaller than the scorpion itself. Feed the adults once every week and the juveniles twice weekly. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc. If the remains are left for an extended period of time an infestation of mites may occur.


Reproduction:Parthenogenetic
Tityus serrulatus are parthenogenetic, meaning that the eggs develop inside the female without fertilization from a male's sperm.


Venom level: 5
The venom toxicity of this scorpion is extremely toxic.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:47 pm

Uroctonus mordax

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Distribution:California, Oregon, and Washington

Housing:Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc.
The young are best housed individually in deli containers with a small piece of bark and several small holes for ventilation.
The adults can be housed together, if fed regularly, in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in aquariums. A water dish should be provided for the adults to drink from. Also, there should be an ample number of hides, depending on the number of adults. A good rule of thumb is one more hide than the number of scorpions in the enclosure.


Substrate:Peat moss or coco fiber
Place about 4 in. or 10 cm of peat moss or coco fiber on the bottom of the enclosure and keep it moist.


Temperature:70-85°F or 21-29.5°C
Maintain the temperature at 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C. The higher the temperature (within this range), the faster the scorpions will grow, breed, and give birth.


Humidity:70-85%

Diet: Crickets or roaches
Feed the scorpions crickets or roaches that are smaller than the scorpion itself. Feed the adults once every week and the juveniles twice weekly. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc. If the remains are left for an extended period of time an infestation of mites may occur.


Reproduction: Sexual

Sexing: Females have 8-12 pectine teeth. Males have 11-15 pectine teeth.

Venom level:1
The venom toxicity of this scorpion is very mild.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:56 pm

Vaejovis carolinianus

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Distribution:North America

Housing: Plastic storage containers, aquariums, etc.
The young are best housed individually in deli containers with a small hide and several small holes for ventilation.
The adults can be housed together, if fed regularly, in plastic storage boxes with holes drilled in them or in aquariums. A water dish should be provided for the adults to drink from. Also there should be an ample number of hides.


Substrate:Peat moss or coco fiber
Place 2-3 in. or 5-7.5 cm of peat moss or coco fiber on the bottom of the enclosure and keep it moist.


Temperature: 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C
Maintain the temperature at 70-85°F or 21-29.5°C. The higher the temperature (within this range) the faster the scorpions will grow, breed, and give birth. A brief cooling period for the adults at 55°F or 13°C during the fall will encourage breeding.


Humidity: 70-80%


Diet: Crickets or roaches
Feed the scorpions crickets or roaches that are smaller than the scorpion itself. Feed the adults once every week and the juveniles twice weekly. Remove prey if it has not been eaten within 24 hours and also remove any remains of eaten prey, such as legs, wings, etc. If the remains are left for an extended period of time an infestation of mites may occur.


Reproduction:Sexual

Venom level: 1
The venom toxicity of this scorpion is mild.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Sun Feb 26, 2012 4:17 pm

Babycurus gigas

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Entymology:This is the largest species in the genus, more than likely the reason of the Latin
name gigas, which can be translated as giant or gigantic.


Distribution:This scorpion is (uptill know) only known fromTanzania. One of the type localities is Tanga,
which is a place near the shore in the North Eastern part of Tanzania, bordering Kenya. The
other locality is an area called Usambara which is in the same corner of the country, but
located to the North West of Tanga. The northern part of this area harbors the Usambara
mountainrange. This distribution pattern suggests to me that it would be more likely to find
this species in neighboring countries like Kenya, then in other countries, mainly because of
various natural borders like Lake Victoria, Lake Tanganyika and Lake Nyasa and for instance
the Rifiji river system in the South of Tanzania, near the border to Mozambique.


Natural habitat:There is much unknown about the natural habitat of this species. The Tanzanian landscape is
dominated by savannahs with trees and is alternated by mountainranges and lakes. It has a
temperate tropical climate.The climate in the North Eastern part of Tanga is rather warm and
humid and the average daytemperature is around 29 Celsius (84 F), the average night
temperature is around 22 Celsius (72 F). There are periods of significant rainfall (+ 114 mm
per month) in the months March, April, May and October. In the Usambara area the climate is
somewhat colder and less humid and the average nighttemperature can drop to 10 Celsius (50
F) in the mountains. It occurs in somewhat xeric as well as in mesic environments; it needs to
have access to humidity like fog and/ or dew for its wellbeing. The scorpion hides most of day
in their retreats under bark, stones and in the leaflitter. Like most scorpions they become more active at night.


Venom:Although this scorpion is from the family Buthidae it is not considered a
medical important species. But since it is a large sized buthid, one need to be careful with this
species and should avoid getting stung. No sting reports or “hear-say” sting incidents are
known


Morphological Information:Babycurus spp. look alike and are difficult to distinguish from one another, especially when
young. In the case of B.gigas, the identification of adults is rather easy because it’s
considerable size of 89-110 mm (3,5-4,5 inches). B.gigas is the largest species in the genus.
The pectinal teeth count of B.gigas is 19-24 for both sexes. Overall coloration of the carapace
is lightbrown with darker areas near the edge of the carapace and the interocular region. The
tergites are more yellowish to lightbrown in juveniles and more light to darkish brown in
adults, with a horizontal elliptic shaped dark brown band (or more bands, mostly three, in
juveniles) across the dorsal side of the mesosoma.
Both juveniles and adults bear a pattern of beautiful yellow vertical stripes across the
mesosoma. The fingers of the pedipalps and chelicerae are blackish. The basitarsus and tarsus
are darker then the other legsegments. The last two caudal segments (IV-V) are darker than
the segments I-III. B.gigas has a darkened patella of the pedipalp, which distuingishes them
from i.e. B.jacksoni). The moveable finger of the pedipalp shows ten rows of granules, the
fixed finger shows nine rows of granules.

Males are distinguished from the females in this species, because of the males having a bigger
manus of the pedipalps or more bulbous chela. Males also have less conspicous keels (less
granulate) on the fifth metasomal segment.


Keeping in Captivity:Keeping of a pair of adults is around 30x20x20
cm (12x 8x 8 inch). It is possible to keep adult specimens of
this species in small groups, consisting of more females than males. keep this species at a
temperature of 24-28 Celsius ( 75-82 F) in the daytime and around 21 C (70 F) at night. The
relative humidity should be around 70-75%, this can be done by keeping one half of the
substrate totally dry (or maybe and occasional misting) and the other half moist (not wet to
prevent mould or mites). Babycurus gigas in general needs to be kept slightly
warmer and a bit moister then B. jacksoni.
mist them well once a week or twice if necessary. At night they rest for longer periods of
time lying in the moist area of the substrate. Humus alone is in my opinion ideal for substrate.
Provide a small bottle cap or film roll cap for water, it is used for drinking and they need
moisture to groom themselves. Provide sufficient ventilation to prevent the air going stale and
to create a level of airflow.

This species breeds without much difficulty in captivity. Average litter size is 12-21. It takes
roughly around 170 days until the females are able to reproduce. Females may reach
adulthood after the fifth ecdysis (200-300 days) and males after the fourth (around 200 days)
or fifth ecdysis (400-450 days). Longevity is around 3 years, Adults should be fed an
appropriate sized prey once a week.

This species are not suitable for beginning scorpion keepers It is an
unpredictable species and can react very fast when it is startled or if there is some kind of
disturbance. B.gigas is slightly more defensive then B.jacksoni and seems less reluctant to
sting. When they are settled in the enclosure, they seem to become less nervous.They are
known to play dead (catalepsy) when startled, especially younger specimens use this
defensemechanism.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Mon Feb 27, 2012 8:51 pm

Androctonus amoreuxi

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Etymology:Has a pale yellow coloration and the metasoma is slender compared to the other species in this genus. Wide distrubution throughout North Africa and the Middle East(Asia). It's not known to be as dangerous as other Androctonus spp. but like any big buthid it should be handled with great care.

Family:Buthidae.

Pectine count:♀21-25 ♂31-35

Venom: Medically important, can cause deaths, most dangerous for children, elderly and people with previous health issues . Take great care when cleaning enclosure or moving specimen.

Enclosure:25x25x25cm is a good size, can be glass or plastic, just make sure it's escape proof and provide good ventilation

Substrate: Desert. If you know the source of collection try to replicate that environment. You don't need a deep substrate, as they only make scrapes beneath objects or hide in natural crevices.

Temperature/Humidity: Day time 30-35 °C, night time 20-25°C.

Feeding:provide food every 14 days in the hot period, once a month in the "winter" period. If the prey item haven't been eaten the next day remove it, and wait until next feeding date. use roaches around 4-5 cm to feed with so if you're using smaller prey items give several or feed more often.

Breeding: Introduce the male to the females enclosure, make sure there's ample hiding places available and a flat surface(stone, wood) where the male can place a spermatophore. They should mate rather quickly as long as the pair are adult and the female not gravid already. Remove the male when you've observed mating or a spermatophore. Gestation period for this species are 4-6 months. Average brood size are around 40. Separate the young into their own plastic boxes when they have hardened up and moved of their mothers back. Temperatures same as adults, feed and mist a corner once a week.



Source:arachnidae.net



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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Tue Feb 28, 2012 12:02 pm

Scorpio maurus ssp.

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Distribution:These are small scorpions with large claws and an attitude, which makes them quite entertaining to keep in captivity. Marked this as a intermediate species as they can be tricky to breed and get to maturity They inhabit deserts in Northern Africa and the Middle East where they dig deep burrows up to 70cm in depth.

Family:Scorpionidae

Size:6-8 cm.

Pectine count:♀18-24 ♂18-24

Venom:Relatively harmless venom, known to be very painfull, said to vary between the different subspecies.

Enclosure:20(w)x20(d)x40(h)cm is a good size for one, can be glass or plastic, just make sure it's escape proof and provide good ventilation. You can keep more together in bigger enclosures, let one establish a burrow then introduce the next.

Substrate: Desert, they are obligate burrowers so make sure the have atleast 20-30 cm substrate. Moistening the top substrate is said to initiate burrowing. Put some gravel in the bottom and a tube down to it, this way you can fill water to the gravel and the burrow will get a humidity gradient.

Temperature/Humidity: Day time 30-35 °C, night time 22-25°C. They should be given a "winter" period where the temperatures are reduced,by turning of all supplemental heating for all desert scorpions from november to march.

Feeding:Feed once a week or every two weeks, depending on size of food animals. Remove uneaten prey the next day.

Breeding: Scorpio maurus palmatus has proven to be hard to breed, this might be caused by their natural season changes which do not occur in captivity.
Once a female does get gravid, it takes a pretty long time (average = 15 months) before possible scorplings are born.
It does happen wild caught females give birth to scorplings in captivity, it has been difficult for most people to keep the scorplings alive, Reproduction in nature takes place in the dry season, May and June. Males and females are found together in a single burrow in this time. Gravid females are visible from June to November, with scorplings living with their mom found from August forward. As soon as the rain season appears in November the scorplings disperse and create their own burrows.


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PostSubject: Re: Scorpion Caresheet   Tue Mar 27, 2012 3:02 pm

sir panu po malalaman kung babae o lalaki ung scorp? Smile
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