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 Lovebirds Species

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PostSubject: Lovebirds Species   Sat Feb 18, 2012 12:14 pm

The name "Love Bird " refers to the nine species of the genus "Agapornis". Eight of these species originate on the African continent, with the ninth coming from the island of Madagascar.
Three species of Love Bird, the Peachfaced, Masked, and Fischer's, are relatively common in captivity. The remaining species are either uncommon, or completely unknown in aviculture, and are collectively referred to as "the rares."

COMMON SPECIES

Peachfaced Love Bird (Agapornis roseicollis) [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
Peachfaced Love Birds are the most common Love Bird species in captivity. They usually breed freely, and are an excellent species for beginning and expert breeders alike. A great many color mutations have been established, with many new ones appearing only in the last few years. There at least seventeen distinct Peachfaced mutations, allowing well over 100,000 possible color combinations. Of all captive bred parrots, perhaps only the Budgerigar comes in a wider array of colors. Peachfaced originate in Southwestern Africa in and around Namibia and Angola. They are fairly common and secure in their natural range. Peachfaced are the largest species of Love Bird, typically weighing in at from 50-60 grams. Abyssinian Love Birds (a. taranta) may be slightly longer than Peachies, but Abbies are quite slender, and Peachfaced will typically outweigh them by several grams. The normally colored Peachfaced shows a beautiful array of colors. The wings and back are dark green, with a lighter green color on the lower breast. The primary flight feathers have dark green on the leading edge, darkening to black near the wingtip, with the trailing edge of the primaries mostly black. The face is a bright red/orange color which gives these birds their name. The rump is an irridescent tourquoise blue, and the beak is horn colored.

Yellow- Collared Lovebird (Agapornis personata) [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
It is also called Masked Lovebird or Eye ringed Love bird. It is a monotypic species of bird of the lovebird genus in the parrot family. They are native to northeast Tanzania, and they have been introduced to Burundi and Kenya.The Yellow-collared Lovebird is a mainly green small parrot about 14.5 cm (5.5 in) long. Its upper parts are a darker green than its lower surfaces. Its head is black, and it has a bright red beak and white eyerings. Yellow on the breast is continuous with a yellow collar and an expansion of yellow over the nape of the neck. Male and female have identical external appearance.The Yellow-collared Lovebird brings nesting material in its beak to a tree cavity for their nest. The eggs are white and there are usually four to five in a clutch. The female incubates the eggs for about 23 days and the chicks leave the nest about 42 days after hatching.
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The blue mutation was originally found in wild birds in the 1920s and is the oldest colour mutation known in the lovebird genus.The other mutations are a result of selective breeding in aviculture, such as two cobalts which will make a mauve (black). Various color mutations exist, including blue, cobalt, mauve, slate, dilute slate, violet, lutino (ino) and albino. The latter two are mutations where some color genes do not get passed on from the previous generation. In the case of the lutino the green color gene is not passed on. In the case of the albino, none of the color genes are passed on. The albino mutation is the latest color mutation.

Fischer's Lovebird (Agapornis fischeri)
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It is a small parrot species of the Agapornis genus. They were originally discovered in the late 19th century, and were first bred in the United States in 1926. They are named after German explorer Gustav Fischer. The Fischer's Lovebird has a green back, chest, and wings. Their necks are a golden yellow and as it progresses upward it becomes darker orange. The top of the head is olive green, and the beak is bright red. The upper surface of the tail has some purple or blue feathers. It has a white circle of bare skin (eyering) around its eyes. Young birds are very similar to the adults, except for the fact that they are duller and the base of their mandible has brown markings. They are one of the smaller lovebirds, about 14 cm (5.5 in)in length and 43-58g weight.
Fischer's Lovebirds show no sexual dimorphism, and it is impossible to tell whether an individual is male or female through plumage alone. The sexes of Agapornis fischeri appear the same, and are distinguished with certainty through DNA testing, and less certainly by their habits in perching. Generally, females sit with their legs farther apart than males because the female pelvis is wider.
Fischer's Lovebird are native to a small area of east-central Africa, south and southeast of Lake Victoria in northern Tanzania. In drought years, some birds move west into Rwanda and Burundi seeking moister conditions. They live at elevations of 1,100-2,200m in small flocks. They live in isolated clumps of trees with grass plains between them. The population is estimated to be between 290,000-1,000,000, with low densities outside of protected areas due to capture for the pet trade; export licenses were suspended in 1992 to halt any further decline in the species.
Fischer's Lovebirds eat a wide variety of foods, including seeds and fruit. They sometimes are pests to farmers, as they eat their crops such as maize and millet.
The breeding season is January through April and June through July. The nest is in a hole in a tree 2 to 15 metres above the ground. The eggs are white and there are usually four or five in a clutch, but there could be as few as three or as many as eight. The female incubates the eggs for 23 days, and the chicks fledge from the nest about 38–42 days after hatching.
Fischer's Lovebirds, like many captive birds, can suffer from feather-plucking if they get bored or stressed. This is more likely to occur with single lovebirds than those kept in pairs or groups. They should have a roomy cage, and should be shown affection if they enjoy it. After feather-plucking starts, it is very hard to stop the habit. Providing them with plenty of toys and giving them more opportunities for entertainment will often reduce or stop the habit. Female lovebirds are prone to egg-binding, an often fatal condition in which an egg cannot be laid as it gets caught in the reproductive tract. It is thought that egg binding often occurs due to a lack of liquid calcium in the diet, which causes a softer shell. To prevent this, females, particularly those kept in pairs, should be given calcium supplementation in their water from a young age. Additionally, egg binding appears more likely amongst younger birds, and might be prevented by discouraging mating in younger birds.

RARE SPECIES

Lilian's Lovebird(Agapornis lilianae)
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Lutino Nyasa (Left) Blue Nyasa (Right)

It is also known as Nyasa Lovebird, is a small African parrot species of the lovebird genus. It is mainly green and has orange on its upper chest and head. It is 13 cm (5 inches) long and is the smallest parrot on mainland Africa. In captivity it is uncommon and difficult to breed.
The Lilian's Lovebird is 13 cm (5 inches) long and is mainly green with white eyerings. It has orange on its head, neck and upper chest and has a green rump. Male and female are identical in external appearance.The Lilian's Lovebird is often mistaken for the slightly larger Fischer's Lovebird, which has an olive-green hood and a blue rump. It is also broadly similar to the Peach-faced Lovebird, which has more clearly demarcated orange colouration, and lacks a white eyering.
Lilian's Lovebird is endemic to Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. In 2004 its numbers in the wild were estimated to be less than 20,000 individuals. It currently inhabits Liwonde National Park (LNP) and a few cluster groups occur in the surrounding forests outside LNP. Its distribution is rapidly becoming restricted to LNP because their feeding and breeding habitats are being exploited over for agricultural purposes. The extent of habitat loss outside LNP has not been determined scientifically although remaining habitat outside the LNP are fragmented Miombo Forest Reserves.


Black Cheeked Lovebird (Agapornis nigrigenis)

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The Black-cheeked Lovebird (Agapornis nigrigenis) is a small parrot species of the lovebird genus. It is mainly green and has a brown head, red beak, and white eyerings. It is endemic in a relatively small range in southwest Zambia, where it is vulnerable to habitat loss.
The Black-cheeked Lovebird is 14 cm (5.5 in) in length,with mostly green plumage, reddish-brown forehead and forecrown, brownish-black cheeks and throat, orange bib below the throat which fades to yellowish-green, white eye-rings and grey feet. Adult have bright red beaks, while juveniles of the species are similar but with a more orange bill. Vocalizations are loud, piercing shrieks, which are very similar to those of other lovebirds.
The Black-cheeked Lovebird is monotypic. The Black-cheeked Lovebird is sometimes seen as a race of Lilian's Lovebird.
The Black-cheeked Lovebird inhabits deciduous woodland, where permanent supplies of surface water exist, as it needs daily access to water. In the dry season, these birds may congregate in large flocks of up to 800 or more.
It is listed as a vulnerable species since it has a small population which is in decline due to continuous habitat loss, particularly due to gradual desiccation of water bodies.

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Blue Black Cheeked Lovebirds

The Black-cheeked Lovebird is relatively easy to breed in aviculture, but there was little interest in breeding them during the first half of the twentieth century at a time when imports were numerous. Now they are uncommon in aviculture and uncommon as pets.




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PostSubject: Re: Lovebirds Species   Sat Feb 18, 2012 3:50 pm

Madagascar Lovebird (Agapornis cana)

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The Grey-headed Lovebird or Madagascar Lovebird (Agapornis cana) is a small species of parrot of the lovebird genus. It is a mainly green parrot. The species is sexually dimorphic and only the adult male has gray on its upper body. They are native on the island of Madagascar and are the only lovebird species which are not native on the African continent. They are the smallest of the lovebird species. It is rarely seen in aviculture and it is difficult to breed in captivity.
The madagascar lovebird is one of the smallest species of the lovebird genus, being 13 cm (5 inches) long and weighing about 30–36 grams. Its beak and feet are pale grey. The species is sexually dimorphic: the adult female is entirely green, with a dark green back and wings, a bright green rump, and a paler green chest; the adult male are similarly colored, except that their entire head and upper chest are a pale gray
Grey-headed Lovebirds are strong fliers, and when open, their wings seem larger in relation to their bodies than those of the Peach-faced Lovebird. They can develop good speed quite quickly and effortlessly, and turn smoothly, though they are not as nimble in the air as the Peach-faced Lovebirds.
Grey-headed Lovebirds were first imported for European aviculture in the second half of the nineteenth century. When imports were permitted and they were available to aviculture in large numbers, little effort was put into breeding. They prefer to breed in the autumn, and because they have poor tolerance for cold weather breeding in aviculture is generally unsuccessful. They tend to be nervous and easily frightened in an aviary.It is quite rare in captivity, with only a very few breeders having successfully reproduced more than one or two generations. This, and the fact that even hand-fed birds remain too shy and nervous to make good pets, are clear reasons for any captive Madagascars to be given a chance to breed, rather than being kept as pets.Grey-headed Lovebirds prefer finch and canary seed over the sunflower/safflower mixes that most other lovebirds eat.

Abyssinian Lovebird (Agapornis taranta)

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It is also known as the black- winged lovebird. mainly green bird of the parrot family. At about 16.5 cm (6.5 inches) long, it is the largest of the lovebird genus, a group of small parrots. The adult male is easily identified by its red forehead, and the adult female by its all green head. They are native to Eritrea and Ethiopia,and they are uncommon as pets
The Black-winged Lovebird, with a length of about 16–16.5m (6.25–6.5 inches), is the largest of all the lovebirds. It is sexually dimorphic, as are the Red-headed Lovebird and Grey-headed Lovebird of the lovebird genus. The dimorphism becomes apparent in juvenile birds after their first molt at about eight or nine months of age. Both the male and female Black-winged Lovebird are mostly green, and only the adult male Black-winged Lovebird has a red forehead and a ring of red feathers around its eyes.
The tail is black tipped and feathers below the tail show a yellowish colour. The rump and feathers above the tail are light green. In the male feathers under the wing are typically black, and in the female the feathers under the wing are typically greenish or brownish black. Both sexes have a red beak and gray feet.
The natural habitat for a Black-winged Lovebird is typically from southern Eritrea to southwestern Ethiopia and they normally live in either high plains or mountainous regions.
The Black-winged Lovebird nests in a tree cavity. The eggs are white and there are usually three or four eggs in a clutch. The female incubates the eggs for 23 days, and the chicks fledge from the nest about 45 days after hatching.In aviculture the Black-winged Lovebird has not become well established as a breeding bird, although it can tolerate cold weather. Breeding in aviculture is on a small scale, so it is an uncommon pet

Red-headed Lovebird (Agapornis pullarius)

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Also known as the Red-faced Lovebird is a member of the genus Agapornis, a group commonly known as lovebirds. Like other lovebirds it is native to Africa.
The Red-headed Lovebird is 15 cm (6 inches) long. It is a mostly green parrot. It has a well demarcated red area on its head extending from the top of the beak, over the forehead to mid-crown, and extending to the left and right up to the eyelid margins. They have grey feet. The underside of the wings are a lighter green. The female has orange head colouring, which is less well demarcated than the males red head. The adult male has a red beak and the female has a paler red beak.
It is native to a wide range in Africa including Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, and Uganda. In addition, it is an introduced species in Liberia.It makes its nest in a termites nest usually in a tree or sometimes on the ground. To make a nest the female digs a tunnel up to a length of 30 cm (11.8 inches) in the termites nest in a colony with other lovebirds.It is difficult to breed in captivity because it has to burrow to make its nest and the nest chamber needs to be heated to about 27C (80F); however, they can be induced to burrow into cork to build a nest. It is a very nervous species.

Black-collared Lovebird (Agapornis swindernianus)


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Also known as Swindern's Lovebird is a small, 13.5 cm (5 in) long, African parrot in the genus Agapornis. It is a mostly green parrot with black band on the back of its neck, and a dark greyish-black bill. Both sexes are similar. It is rarely kept in captivity because of its dietary requirement for a native fig.
It is a mostly green parrot with black-collared nape, brownish red chest, greyish black bill, yellow iris and grey feet. Both sexes are similar.The Black-collared Lovebird is distributed across a wide range in equatorial Africa. It inhabits the forests of Cameroon, Central African Republic, the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia and Uganda.They hide high in the forest canopy and are characterized as being very shy.
It is rare in some parts of its range. The range is so large that the population is difficult to estimate, but it is believed that the population is not under significant threat. The Black-collared Lovebird is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN( International Union for Conservation of Nature ) Red List of Threatened Species.Black-collared Lovebirds are rarely kept in captivity or as pets. They require certain native fig seed or fig flesh as a basis of their daily diet, and without these vital dietary necessities they do not normally thrive or breed well in captivity.



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